Category Archives: Uncategorized

Always Doing Your Best

During this season is a good time to make it clear to your son that you have the expectation that he will always do his best. Assist and encourage him to internalize this concept to the extent that he is displeased with himself when he does not put his best foot forward. You want him to experience the satisfaction of knowing that he has done the very best that he can. ALWAYS..

Throughout school, the most important parental role of all is to shape your child’s attitude toward learning and school, to communicate high expectations, and to help your child set goals and solve learning problems. And setting expectations doesn’t mean telling your child, “We are bound and determined that you are going to get into Harvard.” It means sending the message that doing the best that he can is important for all the things he is going to be able to do in life and that one’s best efforts will usually yield a desired outcome.

A recent column referenced a study undertaken at the National Institute of Mental Health which found that children lack brain connectivity to make decisions on the same organizational and critical thinking levels that mature adults do. But despite this reality, you can help your child learn the importance of always doing his best. You can help him to learn the importance of doing his best in every assignment he undertakes.

As an educator, I have heard numerous parents say in their sons’ or daughters’ presence things like, “I was a terrible math student; I hate math and my child does too! I don’t expect him to be a math genius.”

If you say YOU hate math, be aware that you are shaping your child’s attitude toward math, particularly if you’re a mom speaking to a daughter, or speaking within your daughter’s hearing. Your daughter loves you and wants to be just like you. She may pick up the false message the math isn’t for girls. Most mothers would never say, “I hate reading. I hate books. I haven’t read a book since high school.” Yet somehow many parents apparently feel that it’s okay to disparage their math skills.

Never allow your negative experience to  influence your child. Although you may have had a negative experience in the area of mathematics, expect your child to have a positive experience. You cannot encourage your child to do his best unless he knows that you have this expectation, so you expect your child to succeed in math. In all likelihood, your child will fulfill your expectations. There are few parents who do not have the basic skills to make sure their third grader succeeds in math. Do not project your negative experience onto your child but rather give him (or her) the extra help and reassurance needed to succeed.

As a parent who knows the importance of encouraging your child to do his best, always expect your child to do his or her best, and convey this message in such a way that your child is cognizant of your expectations long before he or she begins formal schooling. One of the most important things you can do for your son is to help him to internalize the importance of always doing his best. This will not only serve your son in good stead, it will also serve those who love and care for him in the same manner.    You’re invited to visit www.untealthen.com

During this season is a good time to make it clear to your son that you have the expectation that he will always do his best. Assist and encourage him to internalize this concept to the extent that he is displeased with himself when he does not put his best foot forward. You want him to experience the satisfaction of knowing that he has done the very best that he can. ALWAYS..

Throughout school, the most important parental role of all is to shape your child’s attitude toward learning and school, to communicate high expectations, and to help your child set goals and solve learning problems. And setting expectations doesn’t mean telling your child, “We are bound and determined that you are going to get into Harvard.” It means sending the message that doing the best that he can is important for all the things he is going to be able to do in life and that one’s best efforts will usually yield a desired outcome.

A recent column referenced a study undertaken at the National Institute of Mental Health which found that children lack brain connectivity to make decisions on the same organizational and critical thinking levels that mature adults do. But despite this reality, you can help your child learn the importance of always doing his best. You can help him to learn the importance of doing his best in every assignment he undertakes.

As an educator, I have heard numerous parents say in their sons’ or daughters’ presence things like, “I was a terrible math student; I hate math and my child does too! I don’t expect him to be a math genius.”

If you say YOU hate math, be aware that you are shaping your child’s attitude toward math, particularly if you’re a mom speaking to a daughter, or speaking within your daughter’s hearing. Your daughter loves you and wants to be just like you. She may pick up the false message the math isn’t for girls. Most mothers would never say, “I hate reading. I hate books. I haven’t read a book since high school.” Yet somehow many parents apparently feel that it’s okay to disparage their math skills.

Never allow your negative experience to  influence your child. Although you may have had a negative experience in the area of mathematics, expect your child to have a positive experience. You cannot encourage your child to do his best unless he knows that you have this expectation, so you expect your child to succeed in math. In all likelihood, your child will fulfill your expectations. There are few parents who do not have the basic skills to make sure their third grader succeeds in math. Do not project your negative experience onto your child but rather give him (or her) the extra help and reassurance needed to succeed.

As a parent who knows the importance of encouraging your child to do his best, always expect your child to do his or her best, and convey this message in such a way that your child is cognizant of your expectations long before he or she begins formal schooling. One of the most important things you can do for your son is to help him to internalize the importance of always doing his best. This will not only serve your son in good stead, it will also serve those who love and care for him in the same manner.    You’re invited to visit www.untealthen.com

During this season is a good time to make it clear to your son that you have the expectation that he will always do his best. Assist and encourage him to internalize this concept to the extent that he is displeased with himself when he does not put his best foot forward. You want him to experience the satisfaction of knowing that he has done the very best that he can. ALWAYS..

Throughout school, the most important parental role of all is to shape your child’s attitude toward learning and school, to communicate high expectations, and to help your child set goals and solve learning problems. And setting expectations doesn’t mean telling your child, “We are bound and determined that you are going to get into Harvard.” It means sending the message that doing the best that he can is important for all the things he is going to be able to do in life and that one’s best efforts will usually yield a desired outcome.

A recent column referenced a study undertaken at the National Institute of Mental Health which found that children lack brain connectivity to make decisions on the same organizational and critical thinking levels that mature adults do. But despite this reality, you can help your child learn the importance of always doing his best. You can help him to learn the importance of doing his best in every assignment he undertakes.

As an educator, I have heard numerous parents say in their sons’ or daughters’ presence things like, “I was a terrible math student; I hate math and my child does too! I don’t expect him to be a math genius.”

If you say YOU hate math, be aware that you are shaping your child’s attitude toward math, particularly if you’re a mom speaking to a daughter, or speaking within your daughter’s hearing. Your daughter loves you and wants to be just like you. She may pick up the false message the math isn’t for girls. Most mothers would never say, “I hate reading. I hate books. I haven’t read a book since high school.” Yet somehow many parents apparently feel that it’s okay to disparage their math skills.

Never allow your negative experience to  influence your child. Although you may have had a negative experience in the area of mathematics, expect your child to have a positive experience. You cannot encourage your child to do his best unless he knows that you have this expectation, so you expect your child to succeed in math. In all likelihood, your child will fulfill your expectations. There are few parents who do not have the basic skills to make sure their third grader succeeds in math. Do not project your negative experience onto your child but rather give him (or her) the extra help and reassurance needed to succeed.

As a parent who knows the importance of encouraging your child to do his best, always expect your child to do his or her best, and convey this message in such a way that your child is cognizant of your expectations long before he or she begins formal schooling. One of the most important things you can do for your son is to help him to internalize the importance of always doing his best. This will not only serve your son in good stead, it will also serve those who love and care for him in the same manner.    You’re invited to visit www.untealthen.com

During this season is a good time to make it clear to your son that you have the expectation that he will always do his best. Assist and encourage him to internalize this concept to the extent that he is displeased with himself when he does not put his best foot forward. You want him to experience the satisfaction of knowing that he has done the very best that he can. ALWAYS..

Throughout school, the most important parental role of all is to shape your child’s attitude toward learning and school, to communicate high expectations, and to help your child set goals and solve learning problems. And setting expectations doesn’t mean telling your child, “We are bound and determined that you are going to get into Harvard.” It means sending the message that doing the best that he can is important for all the things he is going to be able to do in life and that one’s best efforts will usually yield a desired outcome.

A recent column referenced a study undertaken at the National Institute of Mental Health which found that children lack brain connectivity to make decisions on the same organizational and critical thinking levels that mature adults do. But despite this reality, you can help your child learn the importance of always doing his best. You can help him to learn the importance of doing his best in every assignment he undertakes.

As an educator, I have heard numerous parents say in their sons’ or daughters’ presence things like, “I was a terrible math student; I hate math and my child does too! I don’t expect him to be a math genius.”

If you say YOU hate math, be aware that you are shaping your child’s attitude toward math, particularly if you’re a mom speaking to a daughter, or speaking within your daughter’s hearing. Your daughter loves you and wants to be just like you. She may pick up the false message the math isn’t for girls. Most mothers would never say, “I hate reading. I hate books. I haven’t read a book since high school.” Yet somehow many parents apparently feel that it’s okay to disparage their math skills.

Never allow your negative experience to  influence your child. Although you may have had a negative experience in the area of mathematics, expect your child to have a positive experience. You cannot encourage your child to do his best unless he knows that you have this expectation, so you expect your child to succeed in math. In all likelihood, your child will fulfill your expectations. There are few parents who do not have the basic skills to make sure their third grader succeeds in math. Do not project your negative experience onto your child but rather give him (or her) the extra help and reassurance needed to succeed.

As a parent who knows the importance of encouraging your child to do his best, always expect your child to do his or her best, and convey this message in such a way that your child is cognizant of your expectations long before he or she begins formal schooling. One of the most important things you can do for your son is to help him to internalize the importance of always doing his best. This will not only serve your son in good stead, it will also serve those who love and care for him in the same manner.    You’re invited to visit www.untealthen.com

During this season is a good time to make it clear to your son that you have the expectation that he will always do his best. Assist and encourage him to internalize this concept to the extent that he is displeased with himself when he does not put his best foot forward. You want him to experience the satisfaction of knowing that he has done the very best that he can. ALWAYS..

Throughout school, the most important parental role of all is to shape your child’s attitude toward learning and school, to communicate high expectations, and to help your child set goals and solve learning problems. And setting expectations doesn’t mean telling your child, “We are bound and determined that you are going to get into Harvard.” It means sending the message that doing the best that he can is important for all the things he is going to be able to do in life and that one’s best efforts will usually yield a desired outcome.

A recent column referenced a study undertaken at the National Institute of Mental Health which found that children lack brain connectivity to make decisions on the same organizational and critical thinking levels that mature adults do. But despite this reality, you can help your child learn the importance of always doing his best. You can help him to learn the importance of doing his best in every assignment he undertakes.

As an educator, I have heard numerous parents say in their sons’ or daughters’ presence things like, “I was a terrible math student; I hate math and my child does too! I don’t expect him to be a math genius.”

If you say YOU hate math, be aware that you are shaping your child’s attitude toward math, particularly if you’re a mom speaking to a daughter, or speaking within your daughter’s hearing. Your daughter loves you and wants to be just like you. She may pick up the false message the math isn’t for girls. Most mothers would never say, “I hate reading. I hate books. I haven’t read a book since high school.” Yet somehow many parents apparently feel that it’s okay to disparage their math skills.

Never allow your negative experience to  influence your child. Although you may have had a negative experience in the area of mathematics, expect your child to have a positive experience. You cannot encourage your child to do his best unless he knows that you have this expectation, so you expect your child to succeed in math. In all likelihood, your child will fulfill your expectations. There are few parents who do not have the basic skills to make sure their third grader succeeds in math. Do not project your negative experience onto your child but rather give him (or her) the extra help and reassurance needed to succeed.

As a parent who knows the importance of encouraging your child to do his best, always expect your child to do his or her best, and convey this message in such a way that your child is cognizant of your expectations long before he or she begins formal schooling. One of the most important things you can do for your son is to help him to internalize the importance of always doing his best. This will not only serve your son in good stead, it will also serve those who love and care for him in the same manner.    You’re invited to visit www.untealthen.com

During this season is a good time to make it clear to your son that you have the expectation that he will always do his best. Assist and encourage him to internalize this concept to the extent that he is displeased with himself when he does not put his best foot forward. You want him to experience the satisfaction of knowing that he has done the very best that he can. ALWAYS..

Throughout school, the most important parental role of all is to shape your child’s attitude toward learning and school, to communicate high expectations, and to help your child set goals and solve learning problems. And setting expectations doesn’t mean telling your child, “We are bound and determined that you are going to get into Harvard.” It means sending the message that doing the best that he can is important for all the things he is going to be able to do in life and that one’s best efforts will usually yield a desired outcome.

A recent column referenced a study undertaken at the National Institute of Mental Health which found that children lack brain connectivity to make decisions on the same organizational and critical thinking levels that mature adults do. But despite this reality, you can help your child learn the importance of always doing his best. You can help him to learn the importance of doing his best in every assignment he undertakes.

As an educator, I have heard numerous parents say in their sons’ or daughters’ presence things like, “I was a terrible math student; I hate math and my child does too! I don’t expect him to be a math genius.”

If you say YOU hate math, be aware that you are shaping your child’s attitude toward math, particularly if you’re a mom speaking to a daughter, or speaking within your daughter’s hearing. Your daughter loves you and wants to be just like you. She may pick up the false message the math isn’t for girls. Most mothers would never say, “I hate reading. I hate books. I haven’t read a book since high school.” Yet somehow many parents apparently feel that it’s okay to disparage their math skills.

Never allow your negative experience to  influence your child. Although you may have had a negative experience in the area of mathematics, expect your child to have a positive experience. You cannot encourage your child to do his best unless he knows that you have this expectation, so you expect your child to succeed in math. In all likelihood, your child will fulfill your expectations. There are few parents who do not have the basic skills to make sure their third grader succeeds in math. Do not project your negative experience onto your child but rather give him (or her) the extra help and reassurance needed to succeed.

As a parent who knows the importance of encouraging your child to do his best, always expect your child to do his or her best, and convey this message in such a way that your child is cognizant of your expectations long before he or she begins formal schooling. One of the most important things you can do for your son is to help him to internalize the importance of always doing his best. This will not only serve your son in good stead, it will also serve those who love and care for him in the same manner.    You’re invited to visit www.untealthen.com

During this season is a good time to make it clear to your son that you have the expectation that he will always do his best. Assist and encourage him to internalize this concept to the extent that he is displeased with himself when he does not put his best foot forward. You want him to experience the satisfaction of knowing that he has done the very best that he can. ALWAYS..

Throughout school, the most important parental role of all is to shape your child’s attitude toward learning and school, to communicate high expectations, and to help your child set goals and solve learning problems. And setting expectations doesn’t mean telling your child, “We are bound and determined that you are going to get into Harvard.” It means sending the message that doing the best that he can is important for all the things he is going to be able to do in life and that one’s best efforts will usually yield a desired outcome.

A recent column referenced a study undertaken at the National Institute of Mental Health which found that children lack brain connectivity to make decisions on the same organizational and critical thinking levels that mature adults do. But despite this reality, you can help your child learn the importance of always doing his best. You can help him to learn the importance of doing his best in every assignment he undertakes.

As an educator, I have heard numerous parents say in their sons’ or daughters’ presence things like, “I was a terrible math student; I hate math and my child does too! I don’t expect him to be a math genius.”

If you say YOU hate math, be aware that you are shaping your child’s attitude toward math, particularly if you’re a mom speaking to a daughter, or speaking within your daughter’s hearing. Your daughter loves you and wants to be just like you. She may pick up the false message the math isn’t for girls. Most mothers would never say, “I hate reading. I hate books. I haven’t read a book since high school.” Yet somehow many parents apparently feel that it’s okay to disparage their math skills.

Never allow your negative experience to  influence your child. Although you may have had a negative experience in the area of mathematics, expect your child to have a positive experience. You cannot encourage your child to do his best unless he knows that you have this expectation, so you expect your child to succeed in math. In all likelihood, your child will fulfill your expectations. There are few parents who do not have the basic skills to make sure their third grader succeeds in math. Do not project your negative experience onto your child but rather give him (or her) the extra help and reassurance needed to succeed.

As a parent who knows the importance of encouraging your child to do his best, always expect your child to do his or her best, and convey this message in such a way that your child is cognizant of your expectations long before he or she begins formal schooling. One of the most important things you can do for your son is to help him to internalize the importance of always doing his best. This will not only serve your son in good stead, it will also serve those who love and care for him in the same manner.    You’re invited to visit www.untealthen.com

During this season is a good time to make it clear to your son that you have the expectation that he will always do his best. Assist and encourage him to internalize this concept to the extent that he is displeased with himself when he does not put his best foot forward. You want him to experience the satisfaction of knowing that he has done the very best that he can. ALWAYS..

Throughout school, the most important parental role of all is to shape your child’s attitude toward learning and school, to communicate high expectations, and to help your child set goals and solve learning problems. And setting expectations doesn’t mean telling your child, “We are bound and determined that you are going to get into Harvard.” It means sending the message that doing the best that he can is important for all the things he is going to be able to do in life and that one’s best efforts will usually yield a desired outcome.

A recent column referenced a study undertaken at the National Institute of Mental Health which found that children lack brain connectivity to make decisions on the same organizational and critical thinking levels that mature adults do. But despite this reality, you can help your child learn the importance of always doing his best. You can help him to learn the importance of doing his best in every assignment he undertakes.

As an educator, I have heard numerous parents say in their sons’ or daughters’ presence things like, “I was a terrible math student; I hate math and my child does too! I don’t expect him to be a math genius.”

If you say YOU hate math, be aware that you are shaping your child’s attitude toward math, particularly if you’re a mom speaking to a daughter, or speaking within your daughter’s hearing. Your daughter loves you and wants to be just like you. She may pick up the false message the math isn’t for girls. Most mothers would never say, “I hate reading. I hate books. I haven’t read a book since high school.” Yet somehow many parents apparently feel that it’s okay to disparage their math skills.

Never allow your negative experience to  influence your child. Although you may have had a negative experience in the area of mathematics, expect your child to have a positive experience. You cannot encourage your child to do his best unless he knows that you have this expectation, so you expect your child to succeed in math. In all likelihood, your child will fulfill your expectations. There are few parents who do not have the basic skills to make sure their third grader succeeds in math. Do not project your negative experience onto your child but rather give him (or her) the extra help and reassurance needed to succeed.

As a parent who knows the importance of encouraging your child to do his best, always expect your child to do his or her best, and convey this message in such a way that your child is cognizant of your expectations long before he or she begins formal schooling. One of the most important things you can do for your son is to help him to internalize the importance of always doing his best. This will not only serve your son in good stead, it will also serve those who love and care for him in the same manner.    You’re invited to visit www.untealthen.com

During this season is a good time to make it clear to your son that you have the expectation that he will always do his best. Assist and encourage him to internalize this concept to the extent that he is displeased with himself when he does not put his best foot forward. You want him to experience the satisfaction of knowing that he has done the very best that he can. ALWAYS..

Throughout school, the most important parental role of all is to shape your child’s attitude toward learning and school, to communicate high expectations, and to help your child set goals and solve learning problems. And setting expectations doesn’t mean telling your child, “We are bound and determined that you are going to get into Harvard.” It means sending the message that doing the best that he can is important for all the things he is going to be able to do in life and that one’s best efforts will usually yield a desired outcome.

A recent column referenced a study undertaken at the National Institute of Mental Health which found that children lack brain connectivity to make decisions on the same organizational and critical thinking levels that mature adults do. But despite this reality, you can help your child learn the importance of always doing his best. You can help him to learn the importance of doing his best in every assignment he undertakes.

As an educator, I have heard numerous parents say in their sons’ or daughters’ presence things like, “I was a terrible math student; I hate math and my child does too! I don’t expect him to be a math genius.”

If you say YOU hate math, be aware that you are shaping your child’s attitude toward math, particularly if you’re a mom speaking to a daughter, or speaking within your daughter’s hearing. Your daughter loves you and wants to be just like you. She may pick up the false message the math isn’t for girls. Most mothers would never say, “I hate reading. I hate books. I haven’t read a book since high school.” Yet somehow many parents apparently feel that it’s okay to disparage their math skills.

Never allow your negative experience to  influence your child. Although you may have had a negative experience in the area of mathematics, expect your child to have a positive experience. You cannot encourage your child to do his best unless he knows that you have this expectation, so you expect your child to succeed in math. In all likelihood, your child will fulfill your expectations. There are few parents who do not have the basic skills to make sure their third grader succeeds in math. Do not project your negative experience onto your child but rather give him (or her) the extra help and reassurance needed to succeed.

As a parent who knows the importance of encouraging your child to do his best, always expect your child to do his or her best, and convey this message in such a way that your child is cognizant of your expectations long before he or she begins formal schooling. One of the most important things you can do for your son is to help him to internalize the importance of always doing his best. This will not only serve your son in good stead, it will also serve those who love and care for him in the same manner.    You’re invited to visit www.untealthen.com

During this season is a good time to make it clear to your son that you have the expectation that he will always do his best. Assist and encourage him to internalize this concept to the extent that he is displeased with himself when he does not put his best foot forward. You want him to experience the satisfaction of knowing that he has done the very best that he can. ALWAYS..

Throughout school, the most important parental role of all is to shape your child’s attitude toward learning and school, to communicate high expectations, and to help your child set goals and solve learning problems. And setting expectations doesn’t mean telling your child, “We are bound and determined that you are going to get into Harvard.” It means sending the message that doing the best that he can is important for all the things he is going to be able to do in life and that one’s best efforts will usually yield a desired outcome.

A recent column referenced a study undertaken at the National Institute of Mental Health which found that children lack brain connectivity to make decisions on the same organizational and critical thinking levels that mature adults do. But despite this reality, you can help your child learn the importance of always doing his best. You can help him to learn the importance of doing his best in every assignment he undertakes.

As an educator, I have heard numerous parents say in their sons’ or daughters’ presence things like, “I was a terrible math student; I hate math and my child does too! I don’t expect him to be a math genius.”

If you say YOU hate math, be aware that you are shaping your child’s attitude toward math, particularly if you’re a mom speaking to a daughter, or speaking within your daughter’s hearing. Your daughter loves you and wants to be just like you. She may pick up the false message the math isn’t for girls. Most mothers would never say, “I hate reading. I hate books. I haven’t read a book since high school.” Yet somehow many parents apparently feel that it’s okay to disparage their math skills.

Never allow your negative experience to  influence your child. Although you may have had a negative experience in the area of mathematics, expect your child to have a positive experience. You cannot encourage your child to do his best unless he knows that you have this expectation, so you expect your child to succeed in math. In all likelihood, your child will fulfill your expectations. There are few parents who do not have the basic skills to make sure their third grader succeeds in math. Do not project your negative experience onto your child but rather give him (or her) the extra help and reassurance needed to succeed.

As a parent who knows the importance of encouraging your child to do his best, always expect your child to do his or her best, and convey this message in such a way that your child is cognizant of your expectations long before he or she begins formal schooling. One of the most important things you can do for your son is to help him to internalize the importance of always doing his best. This will not only serve your son in good stead, it will also serve those who love and care for him in the same manner.    You’re invited to visit www.untealthen.com

During this season is a good time to make it clear to your son that you have the expectation that he will always do his best. Assist and encourage him to internalize this concept to the extent that he is displeased with himself when he does not put his best foot forward. You want him to experience the satisfaction of knowing that he has done the very best that he can. ALWAYS..

Throughout school, the most important parental role of all is to shape your child’s attitude toward learning and school, to communicate high expectations, and to help your child set goals and solve learning problems. And setting expectations doesn’t mean telling your child, “We are bound and determined that you are going to get into Harvard.” It means sending the message that doing the best that he can is important for all the things he is going to be able to do in life and that one’s best efforts will usually yield a desired outcome.

A recent column referenced a study undertaken at the National Institute of Mental Health which found that children lack brain connectivity to make decisions on the same organizational and critical thinking levels that mature adults do. But despite this reality, you can help your child learn the importance of always doing his best. You can help him to learn the importance of doing his best in every assignment he undertakes.

As an educator, I have heard numerous parents say in their sons’ or daughters’ presence things like, “I was a terrible math student; I hate math and my child does too! I don’t expect him to be a math genius.”

If you say YOU hate math, be aware that you are shaping your child’s attitude toward math, particularly if you’re a mom speaking to a daughter, or speaking within your daughter’s hearing. Your daughter loves you and wants to be just like you. She may pick up the false message the math isn’t for girls. Most mothers would never say, “I hate reading. I hate books. I haven’t read a book since high school.” Yet somehow many parents apparently feel that it’s okay to disparage their math skills.

Never allow your negative experience to  influence your child. Although you may have had a negative experience in the area of mathematics, expect your child to have a positive experience. You cannot encourage your child to do his best unless he knows that you have this expectation, so you expect your child to succeed in math. In all likelihood, your child will fulfill your expectations. There are few parents who do not have the basic skills to make sure their third grader succeeds in math. Do not project your negative experience onto your child but rather give him (or her) the extra help and reassurance needed to succeed.

As a parent who knows the importance of encouraging your child to do his best, always expect your child to do his or her best, and convey this message in such a way that your child is cognizant of your expectations long before he or she begins formal schooling. One of the most important things you can do for your son is to help him to internalize the importance of always doing his best. This will not only serve your son in good stead, it will also serve those who love and care for him in the same manner.    You’re invited to visit www.untealthen.com

During this season is a good time to make it clear to your son that you have the expectation that he will always do his best. Assist and encourage him to internalize this concept to the extent that he is displeased with himself when he does not put his best foot forward. You want him to experience the satisfaction of knowing that he has done the very best that he can. ALWAYS..

Throughout school, the most important parental role of all is to shape your child’s attitude toward learning and school, to communicate high expectations, and to help your child set goals and solve learning problems. And setting expectations doesn’t mean telling your child, “We are bound and determined that you are going to get into Harvard.” It means sending the message that doing the best that he can is important for all the things he is going to be able to do in life and that one’s best efforts will usually yield a desired outcome.

A recent column referenced a study undertaken at the National Institute of Mental Health which found that children lack brain connectivity to make decisions on the same organizational and critical thinking levels that mature adults do. But despite this reality, you can help your child learn the importance of always doing his best. You can help him to learn the importance of doing his best in every assignment he undertakes.

As an educator, I have heard numerous parents say in their sons’ or daughters’ presence things like, “I was a terrible math student; I hate math and my child does too! I don’t expect him to be a math genius.”

If you say YOU hate math, be aware that you are shaping your child’s attitude toward math, particularly if you’re a mom speaking to a daughter, or speaking within your daughter’s hearing. Your daughter loves you and wants to be just like you. She may pick up the false message the math isn’t for girls. Most mothers would never say, “I hate reading. I hate books. I haven’t read a book since high school.” Yet somehow many parents apparently feel that it’s okay to disparage their math skills.

Never allow your negative experience to  influence your child. Although you may have had a negative experience in the area of mathematics, expect your child to have a positive experience. You cannot encourage your child to do his best unless he knows that you have this expectation, so you expect your child to succeed in math. In all likelihood, your child will fulfill your expectations. There are few parents who do not have the basic skills to make sure their third grader succeeds in math. Do not project your negative experience onto your child but rather give him (or her) the extra help and reassurance needed to succeed.

As a parent who knows the importance of encouraging your child to do his best, always expect your child to do his or her best, and convey this message in such a way that your child is cognizant of your expectations long before he or she begins formal schooling. One of the most important things you can do for your son is to help him to internalize the importance of always doing his best. This will not only serve your son in good stead, it will also serve those who love and care for him in the same manner.    You’re invited to visit www.untealthen.com

During this season is a good time to make it clear to your son that you have the expectation that he will always do his best. Assist and encourage him to internalize this concept to the extent that he is displeased with himself when he does not put his best foot forward. You want him to experience the satisfaction of knowing that he has done the very best that he can. ALWAYS..

Throughout school, the most important parental role of all is to shape your child’s attitude toward learning and school, to communicate high expectations, and to help your child set goals and solve learning problems. And setting expectations doesn’t mean telling your child, “We are bound and determined that you are going to get into Harvard.” It means sending the message that doing the best that he can is important for all the things he is going to be able to do in life and that one’s best efforts will usually yield a desired outcome.

A recent column referenced a study undertaken at the National Institute of Mental Health which found that children lack brain connectivity to make decisions on the same organizational and critical thinking levels that mature adults do. But despite this reality, you can help your child learn the importance of always doing his best. You can help him to learn the importance of doing his best in every assignment he undertakes.

As an educator, I have heard numerous parents say in their sons’ or daughters’ presence things like, “I was a terrible math student; I hate math and my child does too! I don’t expect him to be a math genius.”

If you say YOU hate math, be aware that you are shaping your child’s attitude toward math, particularly if you’re a mom speaking to a daughter, or speaking within your daughter’s hearing. Your daughter loves you and wants to be just like you. She may pick up the false message the math isn’t for girls. Most mothers would never say, “I hate reading. I hate books. I haven’t read a book since high school.” Yet somehow many parents apparently feel that it’s okay to disparage their math skills.

Never allow your negative experience to  influence your child. Although you may have had a negative experience in the area of mathematics, expect your child to have a positive experience. You cannot encourage your child to do his best unless he knows that you have this expectation, so you expect your child to succeed in math. In all likelihood, your child will fulfill your expectations. There are few parents who do not have the basic skills to make sure their third grader succeeds in math. Do not project your negative experience onto your child but rather give him (or her) the extra help and reassurance needed to succeed.

As a parent who knows the importance of encouraging your child to do his best, always expect your child to do his or her best, and convey this message in such a way that your child is cognizant of your expectations long before he or she begins formal schooling. One of the most important things you can do for your son is to help him to internalize the importance of always doing his best. This will not only serve your son in good stead, it will also serve those who love and care for him in the same manner.    You’re invited to visit www.untealthen.com

During this season is a good time to make it clear to your son that you have the expectation that he will always do his best. Assist and encourage him to internalize this concept to the extent that he is displeased with himself when he does not put his best foot forward. You want him to experience the satisfaction of knowing that he has done the very best that he can. ALWAYS..

Throughout school, the most important parental role of all is to shape your child’s attitude toward learning and school, to communicate high expectations, and to help your child set goals and solve learning problems. And setting expectations doesn’t mean telling your child, “We are bound and determined that you are going to get into Harvard.” It means sending the message that doing the best that he can is important for all the things he is going to be able to do in life and that one’s best efforts will usually yield a desired outcome.

A recent column referenced a study undertaken at the National Institute of Mental Health which found that children lack brain connectivity to make decisions on the same organizational and critical thinking levels that mature adults do. But despite this reality, you can help your child learn the importance of always doing his best. You can help him to learn the importance of doing his best in every assignment he undertakes.

As an educator, I have heard numerous parents say in their sons’ or daughters’ presence things like, “I was a terrible math student; I hate math and my child does too! I don’t expect him to be a math genius.”

If you say YOU hate math, be aware that you are shaping your child’s attitude toward math, particularly if you’re a mom speaking to a daughter, or speaking within your daughter’s hearing. Your daughter loves you and wants to be just like you. She may pick up the false message the math isn’t for girls. Most mothers would never say, “I hate reading. I hate books. I haven’t read a book since high school.” Yet somehow many parents apparently feel that it’s okay to disparage their math skills.

Never allow your negative experience to  influence your child. Although you may have had a negative experience in the area of mathematics, expect your child to have a positive experience. You cannot encourage your child to do his best unless he knows that you have this expectation, so you expect your child to succeed in math. In all likelihood, your child will fulfill your expectations. There are few parents who do not have the basic skills to make sure their third grader succeeds in math. Do not project your negative experience onto your child but rather give him (or her) the extra help and reassurance needed to succeed.

As a parent who knows the importance of encouraging your child to do his best, always expect your child to do his or her best, and convey this message in such a way that your child is cognizant of your expectations long before he or she begins formal schooling. One of the most important things you can do for your son is to help him to internalize the importance of always doing his best. This will not only serve your son in good stead, it will also serve those who love and care for him in the same manner.    You’re invited to visit www.untealthen.com

 

SAY WHAT YOU MEAN; MEAN WHAT YOU SAY

Are You Raising One of the Next Generation of Hoodlums: Meaning What you Say         “Just Say No” sounds good in theory.  But it implies that saying no is as easy as saying yes, and for most of us, it just isn’t. In practice, saying no usually requires an explanation and saying yes doesn’t. Just… Continue Reading

FAMILY IS IMPORTANT

Are You Raising One of the Next Generation of Hoodlums: The Importance of Family It is very important to assure that your son internalizes the significance of family. One of the reasons so many men are able to walk away from their families, seemingly without looking back, is because as boys they were not taught… Continue Reading

Addressing Recent Tragedy (7/11/16

Thursday night of this past week was one of the worst nights in the history of the city of Dallas.  This comes on the heels of two days where we witnessed the killing of two Black men at the hands of their local authorities.  I won’t even try to pretend to know or understand how… Continue Reading

MORE THINGS TO AVOID

Avoid teaching your son that boys don’t cry. Seeing your son cry isn’t always easy, but when we say things like, “Don’t cry,” we’re invalidating his feelings and telling him that his tears are unacceptable. This causes your son to learn to stuff his emotions, which can ultimately lead to more explosive emotional outbursts. Tell… Continue Reading

THINGS TO AVOID

No parent wants to describe him or herself as a bad parent. ‘Bad parenting’ is used to describe people who are not parenting in a way that will help their child or children become fulfilled, successful adult(s). They aren’t keeping the necessary focus. Of course reasons vary: too busy with other responsibilities to take the… Continue Reading

The Importance of Integrity

Are You Raising One of the Next Generation of Hoodlums: The Importance of Integrity We are not born with integrity. Integrity is a value based on honesty and developed over a lifetime. It requires consistent demonstrations from parents as well as verbal instructions about integrity. In many situations, our society challenges our quest for it.… Continue Reading

RATE YOUR RAISING TACTICS

Are You Raising One of the Next Generation of Hoodlums: RATE YOUR RAISING TACTICS by Dr. Joyce Willard Teal So often we hear of another black man going to prison and/or another black boy becoming entangled in the Juvenile Justice System. Each of these men and boys was once a precious, sweet, innocent and often… Continue Reading

More on Self-Discipline

Previous columns have discussed how important it is for your son to develop self-discipline. In fact, I have previously noted that the development of self-discipline is so important that we will continue to revisit the subject in this column from time to time. It is self-discipline that will prompt your son to shut up instead… Continue Reading

Are You Raising One of the Next Generation of Hoodlums: Making Good Choices

  Are You Raising One of the Next Generation of Hoodlums: Reinforcing Making Good Choices Most parents are aware that helping their sons learn to make good choices is an important part of parenting. Although higher level reasoning skills don’t begin to develop until children are between 7 and 8 years old, even preschool children… Continue Reading